Shono Tokuzo

BIO/CV

b.1942, Oita, Japan

Education
  • 1964

    Graduated from Musashino University for the Arts in Sculpting
    Studied under father, Shono Shounsai, Living National Treasure for bamboo art


Exhibitions & Accolades
  • 1974

    After death of his father, began work on his own and was commissioned by Office of the Prime Minister to make a special White Bamboo Flower Vase to be displayed at Official Guest House in Akasaka Tokyo

  • 1975

    Solo Exhibition at Tokiwa Department Store, Oita (again in 1977, 1986 and 1988)
    Commissioned by Usa Shrine to make special White Bamboo Flower Vase for Agency of the Imperial Household

  • 1979

    Solo Exhibition at Takashimaya Department Store, Tokyo (again in 1985 and 1998)
    Admitted to 11th Nitten (Japan Fine Arts Exhibition) for the first time (thereafter admitted every year)

  • 1980

    Admitted to 2nd Japan New Craft Arts Exhibition (thereafter admitted every year)
    Winner of Governor’s Prize in 1st Japan New Craft Arts Exhibition, Kyushu

  • 1981

    Winner of Encouragement Award at 3rd Japan New Craft Arts Exhibition
    Exhibited in Japan Bamboo Craft Artist’s Exhibition (thereafter exhibited every year)

  • 1982

    Exhibited in Tokyo Young Artist’s Association Utensil Exhibition (thereafter exhibited every year)

  • 1984

    Winner of Encouragement Award at 6th Japan New Craft Arts Exhibition
    Exhibited by invitation in Japan-China-Korea Art Exchange Exhibition
    Winner of Excellence Award at 10th Japan New Craft Arts for Tomorrow Exhibition

  • 1988

    Winner of Member’s Fine Work Prize at 10th Japan New Craft Arts Exhibition

  • 1990

    Winner of Member’s Award at 12th Japan New Craft Arts Exhibition

  • 1993

    Winner of Special Member’s Prize at 15th Japan New Craft Arts Exhibition

  • 1996

    Winner of TV Japan Prize at 22nd Japan New Craft Arts for Tomorrow Exhibition

  • 1998

    Received Member’s Fine Work Prize at 20th Japan New Craft Arts Exhibition
    Winner of Grand Prize at 30th Nitten

  • 1999

    Bamboo Masterworks, Asia Society, New York City, NY

  • 2000

    Bamboo Masterworks, San Francisco Asian Art Museum, CA

  • 2001

    Bamboo Masterworks, Honolulu Academy of Art, HI
    Bamboo Masterworks, Pacific Asia Museum, Pasadena, CA

  • 2002

    Exhibited at Tigerman Himmel Gallery, Chicago, IL

  • 2003

    Three Views of Bamboo, Epstein Museum, Kansas City, KS
    Solo exhibition at TAI Gallery, Santa Fe, NM

  • 2004

    Show and Workshop at The Hand Workshop Art Center, Richmond, VA

  • 2006

    Hin: The Quiet Beauty of Japanese Art, Grinnell College, IA and Chicago Cultural Center, IL
    The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, MA

  • 2008

    New Bamboo: Contemporary Japanese Masters, Japan Society, New York, NY

  • 2009

    Many Shapes of Bamboo III, Oita Prefecture Art Museum

  • 2012

    Legacy of Inspiration: Shono Shounsai and His Students, TAI Gallery, Santa Fe, NM

  • 2013

    Oita’s Art Movement, in partnership with the Oita Prefectural Government, a museum-quality show, TAI Gallery, Santa Fe, NM

  • 2014

    Group show, Japanese American Cultural Community Center, Los Angeles, CA

  • 2017

    Masterpieces of Japanese Bamboo Art, TAI Modern at Joan B Mirviss LTD, New York, NY
    Abbey Collection, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY


Museum Collections
  • Imperial Household, Tokyo
    Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY
    Victoria and Albert Museum, London
    Asian Art Museum, San Francisco, CA
    Oita Prefecture Museum
    Oita City Museum


ARTIST STATEMENT

I consider the essence of the Craft Art is to show and make the best out of the material.  The beauty of the material itself is very important aspect of my work.  In order to achieve this, I do entire process of preparing the bamboo by myself, so that I can have a greater control over what I am working with. I use the bamboo that grow on my mountain and process them traditionally. I cut my own bamboo during the cold winter usually in January or February. After cutting them, the first step is to stand them up in a well-ventilated place for 100 days or so to dry them naturally. Secondly, I leach out oil and sugar content of the bamboo by heating. After that, I dry them further in my special hot chamber for 20 days. At this point, the bamboo becomes a clean ivory color and increases its luster. This is the color I would like to achieve, and doing these process decrease the chance of mildew and nesting insects. It is a painstaking preparation work, but I like to show the real beauty of “white bamboo.” You can also boil the bamboo in alkaline solution to achieve a somewhat similar result, but it is not just the same. I use the bamboo very straightforward. I use the beauty of its own color and compose my work in the way to make the best out of its resilient nature. In my mind, I have this image of “transparent quality” in my bamboo work like a work of glass. That “pureness” is what I always look for. Unlike the other materials in Craft Arts, you can express the beauty of “openness” in the bamboo art.

  • Masterpieces of Japanese Bamboo Art

  • Legacy of Inspiration: Shono Shounsai and His Students

  • Oita’s Art Movement

  • Oita’s Art Moment