Oki Toshie

BIO/CV

b. 1976, Gunma, Japan

Education
  • 1999

    Studied under Iizuka Shokansai


Exhibitions & Accolades
  • 2002

    Admitted to the 42nd Eastern Japan Traditional Craft Arts Exhibition (thereafter admitted many times)

  • 2003

    Winner of the Encouragement Award at the 50th Japan Traditional Craft Arts Exhibition (thereafter admitted many times)

  • 2005

    Admitted to the 10th Japan Traditional Craft Arts Wood and Bamboo Exhibition (thereafter admitted again)

  • 2006

    Received the Tokyo Board of Education Member’s Award at the 46th Eastern Japan Traditional Craft Arts Exhibition
    Became a full member of The Japan Traditional Craft Arts Association

  • 2008

    New Bamboo: Contemporary Japanese Masters, Japan Society, New York City, NY

  • 2009

    Many Shapes of Bamboo III, Oita Prefectural Art Museum
    Received the Member’s Award at the 12th Japan Traditional Craft Arts Wood and Bamboo Exhibition

  • 2010

    Different Sensitivity: Women in Bamboo Art, TAI Gallery, Santa Fe, NM
    Winner of Hokkaido Governor’s Prize at the 50th Eastern Japan Traditional Craft Arts Exhibition

  • 2013

    Winner of Kawatoku Prize at the 53rd Eastern Japan Traditional Craft Arts Exhibition

  • 2017

    Masterpieces of Japanese Bamboo Art, TAI Modern at Joan B Mirviss LTD, New York, NY


Museum Collections
  • David Woods Kemper Memorial Foundation, Kansas City, MO


ARTIST STATEMENT

It is a joy for me to create my artwork.  At the same time, it is painful.  Every time I push my creative boundaries, I hit walls of resistance. This makes me realize how incompetent I am and how much there is still to learn. On top of that, it shows a part of me that I want to hide.  This process is, however, a necessary part of my life just as eating and sleeping are.

I chose to work in the Traditional Craft Organization which has many rules and regulations that limit working in more sculptural forms.  Despite this, I am very comfortable working within this restrained freedom to express myself.

The sound of bamboo splitting gives me a good feeling, and I am energized when I feel the tension of the bamboo strips. Bamboo is such a wonderful medium for me – I am so fortunate to have found it.

After I completed my initial training, I began to express myself in my work. I try to show in an abstract manner the beauty of the ideas I see in my mind. Over the past two years, I have been thinking about what beauty is and what beauty I can create with this special medium.  It is not an easy path to be a bamboo artist, but I will try to push myself further with each new piece.

  • Masterpieces of Japanese Bamboo Art

  • Japanese Bamboo and the World Expo: A Century of Discovery

  • A Different Sensitivity: Women in Bamboo Art